BOOK REVIEW: Jaws of Steel

Jaws of Steel

Jaws of Steel is the best book I’ve read refuting the practices of fur and sport trapping. The author is a wildlife biologist and former trapper, and his common sense arguments ring truer than some of the points put forward by urban activists.

Apparently, the trapping industry has also seen Eveland as a grave and unique threat. After penning a newspaper article critical of trapping, Eveland states he was

immediately attacked by local individual trappers, county trapper organizations, and even by the state and nationally-organized pro-trapping groups. They attacked my credibility as a professional biologist, tried to have me removed from my job and tried to publicly discredit my reputation in the community in which I live. But in everything they tried to do they failed miserable in one important area; they did not provide one shred of scientific proof that I was wrong or they right. In other words, if you discredit the messenger there’s no need to worry about addressing the message!

Not really surprising, as such is the methodology of consumptive use industries everywhere, and has been for quite some time.

In my view, the best section of the book was that refuting trappers’ perpetual claim that their “sport” controls rabies in animals. Eveland devastates this very common (but actually quite weak) justification in a way that any reader can understand.

Another section that was great fun to read was Eveland’s dismantlement of the “predator control” argument made by trapping apologists. After presenting a list of the most common animals trapped under the guise of “predator control,” Thomas states:

Take note of the one common denominator among these [frequently trapped] species—they all have pelts with economic value. What a coincidence! Of all the predatory species in the world, from spiders to killer whales, it just so happens that the above listed furbearing species have somehow found a way to break natural laws and hence, need to be controlled.

(REVIEW ORIGINALLY APPEARED AT GOODREADS.COM)

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